Like other chronic illness,diabetes poses a wide range of problems for patients and their family members. These include pain, hospitalization changes in lifestyle and vocation, physical disabilities, and threatened survival. Direct psychological consequences can arise from anyone of these factors, making it harder for patients to treat their diabetes and research has shown this disease to be hereditary. BAIHP's goal is prevention through education. Screenings, education, supportive equipment, and referral are used to delay complications of diabetes.

 Even after you eat, you may still feel very hungry. That’s because your muscles aren’t getting the energy they need from the food; your body’s insulin resistance keeps glucose from entering the muscle and providing energy. Therefore, the muscles and other tissues send a “hunger” message, trying to get more energy into the body.

 Infections: The effects of type 2 diabetes make it harder for your body to fight off an infection, so you may experience frequent infections. Women may have frequent vaginal (yeast) and/or bladder infections. That’s because bacteria can flourish when there are high levels of glucose in the blood

Both men and women with diabetes can develop sexual problems because of damage to nerves and small blood vessels. When a person wants to lift an arm or take a step, the brain sends nerve signals to the appropriate muscles. Nerve signals also control internal organs like the heart and bladder, but people do not have the same kind of conscious control over them as they do over their arms and legs. The nerves that control internal organs are called autonomic nerves, which signal the body to digest food and circulate blood without a person having to think about it. The body's response to sexual stimuli is also involuntary, governed by autonomic nerve signals that increase blood flow to the genitals and cause smooth muscle tissue to relax. Damage to these autonomic nerves can hinder normal function. Reduced blood flow resulting from damage to blood vessels can also contribute to sexual dysfunction.

Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired.

This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess glucose through urination.

Slow wound healing: Similar to the body’s inability to fight off infections, it might take longer for wounds (even small cuts) to heal. The high blood glucose level affects how well the white blood cells (which are in charge of healing wounds) work.

Blurry vision: In an attempt to get more fluid into the blood to counteract the high blood glucose level, your body may pull fluid from the eyes. You may have trouble focusing then, leading to blurry vision.

Diabetes is one of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy in England. Between 10% and 20% of people recently diagnosed with diabetes will have a peripheral neuropathy, called peripheral polyneuropathy. In diabeticpolyneuropathy, tingling and other symptoms often first develop in both feet and ascend the legs, followed by tingling and other symptoms that affect both hands and ascend the arms. People with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nerve damage. In many cases, these symptoms are the first signs of diabetes.

Weight loss: You may be eating more but still losing weight. Since your body isn’t getting energy from food, it turns to muscles and fat and starts to break them down in order to create energy. That will cause you to lose weight.

Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination.